Be the top candidate

Six ways to be the top candidate for the job

Kevin Makra|

Despite the challenges job seekers face, there is a simple truth when it comes to looking for work – employers want to hire you. It is true. Employers want you to be that one successful candidate. However, this is not an open-ended offer. Employers want to hire you, if you have specific the qualifications, skills and abilities necessary for the position and to succeed.

Think about it, it costs an employer important time and money to find the proper candidate. They want to fill a position as quickly as possible. If you could be that one person to fill their employment needs, wouldn’t they be happy? Wouldn’t you be happy?

So why not be this person? Why not stand out from the crowd? Why not give an employer every reason to hire you? Successful marketers often say ‘you need to exceed the expectations of a customer’. As someone marketing themselves to get hired, you need to strive to exceed the expectations of an employer.

Contrary to what many believe, there is another simple truth about employers – most firms in most industries are always hiring, even now. Progressive companies are always looking for top candidates. How do you become a top candidate? It is certainly not easy, but well within your reach.

Here are six important ways to make an employer want to hire you:

    Do Your Homework – To be the candidate an employer cannot refuse, you need to know an employer inside out. What is the company’s mission statement? What is their organizational culture? What is their past financial performance? What major challenges do they face? Find out as much as you can.

    Be Open to Retraining – Let’s face it, if you don’t have the necessary qualifications employers seek than you are at a competitive disadvantage right from the start. Consider retraining for those important skills that will attract employers. Upgrading your skills also sends a strong signal that you are proactive and serious about working for a company.

    Show How You Will Fit In – To be a top candidate for hire, you need to deliberately think about how your skills will fit with an employer. What value proposition do you bring to the table? Why should an employer hire you over someone else? Answering these questions will help you rise to a level to beat out the competition.

    Pitch Your Soft Skills – Skills such as communication, writing and reading comprehension are extremely important to employers. You may be a whiz in math, but if you can’t convey your thoughts effectively, employers get easily turned off. Think about your ‘elevator pitch’. In a couple of sentences you should be able to ‘sell yourself’ to an employer. Don’t underestimate the power of soft skills.

    Think About Your Online Presence – Even before you even walk in for a job interview, a savvy employer will already know a lot about you through your online presence. What will they find out about you? You need to have a consistent online brand that speaks to employers. Remove any questionable content that can sabotage your efforts.

    Have an Unstoppable Enthusiasm – Employers can tell the difference between candidates who are simply looking for a job to pay the bills, or someone who has a genuine enthusiasm and excitement to work for them. Employers are more willing to overlook minor areas you may be lacking if you have a strong desire to learn. Let your enthusiasm and passion shine through.

Top firms are always looking for critical players and there is no reason you shouldn’t be the candidate they want to hire. Make an employer an offer they can’t refuse and convince them you are the only person for the job. They will have every reason to hire you!


Kevin Makra is the President of Sentor Media Inc., and founder of DirectoryOfCareers.ca. He can be reached at kmakra@sentormedia.com.


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Category: Job interviews, Job Search Strategies,
 
  • http://about.me/davidalangay David Gay

    “Be Open to Retraining” – Many job seekers in fact are very open to learning a new trade or skill in order to find work. The problem not mentioned in the article is the cost. University tuition fees can cost as high as $15000 and Second Career is not always available for mature workers like myself. I’ve raised a concern in one of my articles at my blog about the “working-class” being synonymous with “wealthy-class”, because jobs will soon become a commodity people can buy and post-secondary education will only be available for those with money.

    The best kind of training is on-the-job training but companies are asking one to two years previous experience in entry level positions like cashiers and cleaners. Companies need to loosen the restrictions on these entry level jobs.

    http://about.me/davidalangay

  • Samuel Sogeke

    I find of particular interest ‘pitching your soft skills’. While it is a tried and tested strategy, for some, weather, interviewer disposition, corporate unwritten rules are odds to tackle.